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How well do you know Canadian Aviation? (Questions 11-20)

The Halifax International Airport has a replica of a famous aircraft hanging from the ceiling in its International Hall. What is it?


January 22, 2009
By Wings Magazine

Topics

1.The Halifax International Airport has a replica of a famous aircraft hanging from the ceiling in its International Hall. What is it?

a) Gossamer Albatross
b) Sopwith Camel
c) McDowall monoplane
d) Silver Dart

Answer: (d) – Built by the Aerial Experiment Association under the leadership of Alexander Graham Bell, it was the first powered, heavier-than-air machine to fly in Canada (February 23, 1909).

2. The National Research Council Institute for Aerospace Research purchased a second jet to fly 5,000-foot high parabolic curves, obtaining 22-23 seconds of zero 'G' time for microgravity experiments. What is the aircraft?

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a) Falcon 20
b) Boeing 707
c) Airbus A-300
d) Lockheed T-33

Answer: (a) – The Boeing and Airbus do zero ‘G’ work for NASA and the European Space Agency, respectively. The T-33 was the first NRC Institute plane used for zero 'G' research.

3. Canada’s highest-scoring fighter pilot of the Second World War came from Verdun, Quebec. What was his name?

a) George Frederick Buerling
b) Vincent Woodward
c) Henry John Lawrence Botterell
d) Sydney Shulesman

Answer: (a) – He destroyed 33 aircraft (another source says 31) in aerial combat and was killed in a flying accident in Rome in May, 1948, at the age of 27.

4. The term “ab initio” is used to refer to both air traffic controllers and pilots at a certain point in their careers. What does this Latin term mean?

a) Absolutely incredible
b) From the beginning
c) After initiation
d) All washed up

Answer: (b) –  It is rumoured that that disciples of “tabula rasa” (having no innate ideas) wonder why the term “ex nihilo” (out of nothing) was not chosen instead.

5. In 1999 NAV CANADA deployed an air traffic control tool that makes it easier for controllers to accurately space aircraft on the arrival streams to the Calgary International Airport. What is it called?

a) CRDA
b) Direct-To
c) Multilateration
d) ADSE-X


Answer: (d) – The Converging Runway Display Aid helps controllers better estimate the distance of arriving aircraft from the intersection of runways 34/28 and 16/10, thereby improving the arrival rate.

6. What was the great contribution that Dr. Albert Ross Tilley made to the lives of airmen?

a) Tilley Hat
b) Burn victim treatment
c) Oxygen tank
d) Laser eye surgery

Answer: (b) – Born in Bowmanville, Ontario, Tilley was a plastic surgeon and pioneer in the treatment of airmen’ burns in WWII. He is a member of Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame.

7. Which song includes the lines: While as for the Canadians/Ah! That’s a different thing/They couldn’t stand our accent/And built a separate Wing.
a) The Guinea Pig Anthem
b) Johnny Got a Zero
c) Skidding Down the Runway
d) Lancasters

Answer: (a) –
Formed in 1941, Guinea Pig Club members, some of them Canadians, were severely-burned airmen at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Sussex, England who had endured at least 10 operations for their burns.

8. Most Canadian three-letter airport codes begin with the letter “Y”. Which airport has the code YYY?
a) Mont Joli
b) Desolation Sound
c) Kangiqsualujjuaq
d) The Pas

Answer: (a) – This little airport, with a 6000-foot runway, is located just east of Rimouski, Quebec.

9. How many women have been inducted into the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame?
a) 17
b) 10
c) 26
d) 6

Answer: (d) – For quick reference, their last names are: Bjornson, Bristol, Dowling, MacGill, Orr and Reilly. Although two male astronauts, Garneau and Hadfield, are members, the first Canadian woman in space, Roberta Bondar, is not.

10. Which of the following four activities do not count as aircraft movements?
a) takeoff
b) landing
c) missed instrument
d) practice instrument

Answer: Actually, they all count as movements. According to Statistics Canada (c) and (d) are subtypes of simulated approaches – the only type of movement where the aircraft do not land.