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NAV CANADA and Aéroports de Montréal invest in new technology

Jan. 28, 2009, Ottawa – NAV CANADA and Aéroports de Montréal (ADM) announced today that they are jointly investing in a new multilateration surface surveillance system that will improve aircraft and vehicle visibility.


January 28, 2009
By Carey Fredericks

Jan. 28, 2009, Ottawa – NAV CANADA and Aéroports de Montréal (ADM) announced today that they are jointly investing in a new multilateration surface surveillance system that will improve aircraft and vehicle visibility on the runways and the airport apron at Montreal-Trudeau Airport. The technology is called Multistatic Dependent Surveillance (MDS).

“This exciting new joint venture promises to improve safety and reduce delays for both airlines and passengers at Montreal-Trudeau Airport,” said Normand Boivin, ADM Vice President of Airport Operations. “MDS for airport surveillance will help to keep us on the leading edge in airport technology and efficiency.”

“We are pleased to partner with ADM on this initiative,” said John Crichton, NAV CANADA President and CEO. “The MDS technology has safety and efficiency benefits for our air traffic controllers who control the runways and taxiways, and for airport personnel who provide service to the apron, gate areas and de-icing facilities.

“With its advanced surveillance capabilities, MDS promises to help reduce costly delays, contributing to lower airline fuel costs and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.”

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Supplied by Syracuse, N.Y. based Sensis Corporation, MDS uses multiple low-maintenance, durable sensors to triangulate aircraft location based on transponder signals from the aircraft. MDS’ network of non-rotating sensors significantly enhances surveillance coverage from the current surface radar, especially during inclement weather conditions such as rain and snowstorms. The resulting surveillance information – precise aircraft position and identification – is then provided to air traffic controllers.

“MDS will complement the surface radar technology we currently have in place,” said Crichton. “Radar sometimes has limitations due to obstacles, line of sight and poor weather conditions. By identifying the aircraft and vehicles through transponder-based multilateration, MDS will help provide NAV CANADA controllers and airport personnel with a more complete picture of the airport surface.”

Sensis multilateration is the most field-proven system in the industry, with more than 90 sites worldwide. More than 50 airports worldwide rely on Sensis technology for ground surveillance, including some of the largest such as London Heathrow Airport, Charles de Gaulle Airport Paris and Geneva International Airport.
 
NAV CANADA, the country's civil air navigation services provider, is a private sector, non-share capital corporation financed through publicly-traded debt. With operations coast to coast, NAV CANADA provides air traffic control, flight information, weather briefings, aeronautical information services, airport advisory services and electronic aids to navigation.
 
Aéroports de Montréal is the local airport authority responsible for the management, operation and development of Montréal–Trudeau and Montréal–Mirabel international airports under the terms of a lease entered into with Transport Canada in 1992. The Corporation employs a total of some 600 persons at both airports and at head office.
 
Sensis Corporation provides sensors, information technology, and simulation and modeling to the world’s air navigation service providers, civil aviation authorities, airports, airlines and militaries.  Sensis Corporation solutions are deployed around the world.  For more information regarding Sensis Corporation, visit www.sensis.com.