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New control tower in Denmark using NAV CANADA technology

Feb. 7, 2008, Ottawa - On December 29, Air Traffic Controllers inside the new 70 metre-high control tower at Copenhagen Airport began monitoring and guiding aircraft with the help of NAV CANADA technology.


February 7, 2008
By Carey Fredericks

Feb 7, 2008 – On December 29, Air Traffic Controllers inside the new 70
metre-high control tower at Copenhagen Airport began monitoring and
guiding aircraft with the help of NAV CANADA technology.

Naviair, the Danish air navigation service provider, teamed up with NAV CANADA to adapt the Canadian-designed Extended Computer Display System
(EXCDS), the advanced 'paperless' flight-data system, for Copenhagen's new
tower.

The Danish version of EXCDS is called NITOS, for Naviair
Integrated Tower Operating System, now an integral part of Naviair's
newly upgraded air traffic management system.
Copenhagen is the fifth European airport to adapt the NAV
CANADA-developed technology. NATS, the U.K. air navigation service
provider, has implemented the system in four London-area airports, most recently in the new control tower at Heathrow International Airport.

"We are honoured to have been part of the successful Naviair project to upgrade its entire air traffic management system," says John Crichton, President and CEO. "Our participation demonstrates once again that EXCDS is
flexible and adaptable, with the NAV CANADA technology solutions team behind it – a team of experts with extensive experience in Air Traffic Management both in Canada and abroad."

The Naviar modernization program is aimed at increasing the capacity in the airspace over Denmark, making it possible to participate in the work of coordinating and facilitating operations in the European airspace.

"This system improves efficiency and enhances the quantity and flow of flight data," says Morten Dambaek, Director General of Naviair. "There's also the added potential to grow capacity in the future."

With EXCDS technology, controllers use touch-sensitive computer screens
to monitor aircraft and manage air-traffic flow – ending the use of
traditional paper strips that have existed from the earliest days of
air traffic control. The system provides immediate access to key
information, reduces communications time between controllers, and
improves overall traffic
management.