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New TSA proposal must balance security With mobility

Oct. 10, 2008,Washington, D.C. – NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen yesterday said a Transportation Security Administration proposed rulemaking sent to the Federal Register for industry and public comment will be reviewed carefully to ensure it reflects the needs of business aviation.


October 10, 2008
By Carey Fredericks

Oct. 10, 2008,Washington, D.C. – The National Business Aviation Association’s (NBAA) President and CEO Ed Bolen yesterday said a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) proposed rulemaking sent to the Federal Register for industry and public comment will be reviewed carefully to ensure it reflects the twin needs for security and mobility that are hallmarks of business aviation.

NBAA has been working with officials from the TSA for many months to provide information and background on the requirements of business aviation operations, and the many improvements that the industry has undertaken voluntarily and in concert with the Departments of Transportation and Homeland Security since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

“We’ve been discussing the TSA’s security plans with our members, and keeping them apprised of our ongoing efforts to maintain that vital balance between the need to strengthen aviation security and to preserve the mobility and flexibility that are at the foundation of business aviation,” Bolen said.

“The TSA proposed rulemaking contains 260 pages,” Bolen said.  “We will review it carefully, consulting with NBAA’s Security Council and coordinating with our members to comment on this plan,” he said.  “Based on an initial review, we expect to file substantial comments on the proposal,” ended Bolen.

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The proposed TSA regulations would cover aircraft with a maximum certified takeoff weight (MTOW) above 12,500 pounds, and the general aviation (GA) airports that serve these larger aircraft.  Known as the Large Aircraft Security Program (LASP), the TSA plan includes security training for flight crews, periodic security audits for operators, and requirements for GA and other airports that service large aircraft.

The proposal provides 60 days for the public to provide comments.  NBAA plans to conduct a series of Town Hall meetings across the country to solicit Member input.  NBAA will release a schedule next week detailing the meeting times and locations.

Information on the numerous voluntary actions on security taken by the business aviation community since 9/11 can be reviewed at NBAA’s web site, at web.nbaa.org/public/ops/security/ .