ASU to train FAA inspectors, pilots on NVGs

May 17, 2017
Written by Aviation Speciaties Unlimited
Aviation Specialties Unlimited, (ASU) has been chosen as the first company ever contracted to train the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Flight Standards Operations Inspectors and Aircraft Certification Pilots on the use of night vision goggles (NVGs) while operating fixed wing aircraft.  ASU will provide both initial training and recurrent training to FAA beginning on July 1 through June 30, 2020.

“The FAA has trusted ASU to train their helicopter Aviation Safety Inspectors for years,” said Director of Operations Justin Watlington. “By awarding this training contract to ASU, the FAA demonstrates that they remain confident in our knowledge and experience. It also affirms our continued focus on saving lives through expansive training. We are committed to making sure that anyone using night-vision goggles to aid in nighttime operations has all the tools necessary to come home safely after each flight. A vital part of that is proper training.”

ASU’s training will take place in Boise, Idaho in the high desert mountains and in remote areas where low-light conditions made it ideal for training. ASU has trained pilots and crews from around the world that fly in extreme conditions for unique missions.  For initial NVG flight training FAA pilots and inspectors will receive eight hours of classroom training, two hours of daytime flight training and 10 hours of NVG flight training. Recurrent training will also be conducted at the Boise ASU site.

“We continue to champion the use of night vision goggles around the world to save lives and increase safety,” said ASU president Jim Winkel.  “Our aviation community can look forward to a safer tomorrow as more advocates for flight safety like the FAA receive NVG training and gain valuable insight into safe NVG flight operations. We are committed to allocating resources to further education and training not only in the United States but also around the world. We appreciate the vote of confidence by the FAA and look forward to working with them soon.”

Earlier in the year, ASU also obtained approval from the FAA as the first 14 CFR Part 135 single-engine operator approved to fly both cargo and passengers in fixed wing aircraft while using night vision goggles.

Related items

  • Canada Jetlines announces delay of launch date
    Canada Jetlines Ltd. is pleased to provide an update on certain recent corporate developments related to financing, the regulatory process, aircraft acquisition, personnel additions and launch timeline. Jetlines has been diligently pursuing a number of initiatives required for the start-up of operations as an ultra-low-cost carrier. Over the last year since Jetlines commenced trading on the TSX Venture Exchange, it has accomplished the following:
  • Glidepath: Industry evolution may select out the jumbo jet
    The calendar has barely flipped over for 2018 and things are heating up already. That sound of rushing air you heard wasn’t a hurricane, it was just the management team at Bombardier daring to take a deep breath after the stunning ruling from the U.S. International Trade Commission overturning the 292.21 per cent tariff levied earlier on C-Series jets. The deal with Delta Airlines will go ahead.
  • Alternate Approach: Bombardier's C Series constitutes disruptive technology
    This magazine was correct when it went against industry wisdom and predicted in a January / February cover story on Bombardier that a punitive 292 per cent tariff on C Series airplanes exported to the United States had no where to go but down.

Add comment

Security code

Subscription Centre

New Subscription
Already a Subscriber
Customer Service
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

Latest Careers