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Time, currents, uncertainly make MH370 search difficult

March 25, 2014, Canberra, Australia – Not one object has been recovered from the missing airliner that Malaysian officials are now convinced plunged into the southern Indian Ocean 17 days ago. Some of the pieces are likely 3,500 metres (11,500 feet) underwater. Others are bobbing in a fickle system of currents that one oceanographer compares to a pinball machine. And by now, they could easily be hundreds of kilometres (miles) away from each other.


March 25, 2014
By The Montreal Gazette.

March 25, 2014, Canberra, Australia – Not one object has been recovered from the
missing airliner that Malaysian officials are now convinced plunged into
the southern Indian Ocean 17 days ago. Some of the pieces are likely
3,500 metres (11,500 feet) underwater. Others are bobbing in a fickle
system of currents that one oceanographer compares to a pinball machine.
And by now, they could easily be hundreds of kilometres (miles) away
from each other.

The job of gathering this wreckage, and
especially the black boxes that will help determine what happened to
Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, is an unprecedented challenge. The crews
who needed two years to find a black box from the Air France flight lost
in the Atlantic in 2009 had much more information to go on. | READ MORE